Share this page Print

FAQ: Wind and solar power – Bearspaw Operations Workplace Centre

Bearspaw Operations Workplace Centre has been identified as the pilot site for renewable energy initiatives, including wind and solar power.

Solar power - frequently asked questions

  1. Is solar energy a good choice for Bearspaw Operations Workplace Centre?
  2. Does The City have similar solar installations at other buildings?
  3. Will the electricity generated by the solar panels go into the grid?
  4. What impact will this project have on neighbouring homes and businesses?
  1. Is solar energy a good choice for Bearspaw Operations Workplace Centre?

    Yes. Calgary is the sunniest city in Canada with an average of 2,405 hours of bright sun per year and ranks second among major Canadian cities in solar photovolataic (PV) production potential.

    Exploring options for harnessing the power of the wind and the sun aligns with ImagineCalgary and the Municipal Development Plan goals, as well as with energy and environmental targets specified in the 2020 Sustainability Direction and The City’s Environmental Policy. 

  2. Does The City have similar solar panel installations at other buildings?

    The installation of a large scale system (50 KW) at Bearspaw Operations Workplace Centre will be the first large City-owned installation that could be replicated on other City-owned sites/buildings. Currently, the largest City-owned installation is a 10 KW system installed in 2012 at the TELUS Convention Centre in downtown Calgary. There are also some small solar installations at a few fire halls across Calgary. 

  3. What impact will this project have on neighbouring homes and businesses?

    Rooftop solar panels are quiet, stationary and do not produce any glare. As a result, they have very little or no impact on neighbours or tenants once installed. 

  4. Are you planning other renewable energy projects for the Bearspaw OWC site?

    The renewable energy projects exploring wind and solar power are currently underway at Bearspaw OWC. At this point there are no other options being investigated at this site. However, wind assessments and new solar assessments for other City-owned sites are in the early stages. 
 

Wind power - frequently asked questions

  1. Are permits required for the temporary wind assessment mast?
  2. Are you planning to do more wind assessment projects across Calgary?
  3. Are you going to move forward with either the wind assessment or the solar assessment separately if one isn’t feasible?
  4. Where do the safety standards for wind turbines come from?
  1. Are permits required for the temporary wind assessment mast?

    No. The City of Calgary's Development and Building Approvals confirmed that no development permit is required for the temporary wind assessment mast as per LUB1P2007 S.25 (w). No building permit is required because the structure (mast/tower) is unoccupied, not permanent, not tied to any utility and not attached to any existing or new structure. 

  2. Are you planning to do more wind assessment projects across Calgary?

    The Bearspaw Operations Workplace Centre wind assessment started in fall 2012 and the project is considered a pilot. New wind assessment projects on other City work sites are in the early stages. A wind assessment at Shepard Operations Workplace Centre will start in 2014.  

  3. Are you going to move forward with either the wind or the solar project separately if one isn’t feasible?

    If both the wind assessment and solar assessment reports are positive we will move on to the next steps for both. If only one is feasible – either the wind power or the solar power initiative - we will move forward with only that part of the project. 

  4. Where do the safety standards for wind turbines come from?

    Safety standards for wind turbines are set by International Electrotechnical Commission(IEC). The IEC is a non-profit organization with a central office in Geneva, Switzerland. It regulates and sets safety standards for all electrotechnology systems including renewable energy systems such as wind turbines. National and local governments implement and police the compliance to these safety standards. Advocacy groups such as the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CANWEA); American Wind Energy Association (AWEA); European Wind Energy Association (EWEA); Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC); and the Pembina Institute help make sure the wind industry follows these standards.  

For more information: