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 Open Spaces: Windows to a View (2010-2011)

In 2010, eight artists were chosen to participate in the Open Spaces: Windows to a View program from May 2010 to April 2011. Below are the featured artists for the 2010-2011 exhibition year.

For more information, please contact the Public Art Program.

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About the Artists

Judy Ueda

Judy's work is often taken from a response to the landscape and a feeling of coming home. "I am motivated by the vastness and solitude of the Alberta landscape and although there is stillness and peacefulness there is also movement and change." Judy's goal is to depict the fundamental essence of the landscape and simplify this into its basic elements.

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Marjan Eggermont

Marjan is interested in socially-oriented work including the homeless count series she began in 2000. Interested in portraying statistics visually, she says, "It is very easy to dismiss a number on paper - a visual representation is much more powerful."  Marjan has used 4060 monopoly houses to display Calgary's 2008 homeless count.

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Roxanne Driediger

Roxanne is a Calgary-based emerging artist and a recent graduate of the Alberta College Art and Design drawing program. Her main practice consists of drawings and paintings that explore themes of gender, place and belonging. She has shown work throughout Calgary and parts of the United States.

Her collection of two-dimensional painted works for OPEN SPACES addresses ideas about community, identity and cultural diversity from a Calgary woman's perspective. The playful and approachable works address ideas about contemporary costuming and everyday social performance in an effort to define attitude and character that is distinctly Calgarian.

Roxanne currently works closely with artists with developmental disabilities as a studio and exhibition coordinator for the In-Definite Arts Society in Calgary.  

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Erin Belanger

"Erin is an emerging Calgary artist who investigates nostalgia, more specifically camp, as a means to access collective memory. Although the origins of the word are unclear, Susan Steward explains that camp has come to mean "an affection, or appreciation of manners and tastes commonly thought to be outlandish, vulgar or banal, implying both an imitation and the inauthentic."
- Stewart, Susan. On Longing. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 1993. Page 168

"The concept of collective memory is compelling," says the artist. "The idea that a single image can stir feelings in a myriad of viewers is emblematic of a deep-seated desire to belong  to a group; it is human nature to seek connections with other individuals. I believe this desire becomes a shared experience enabling connections to form, thus providing a sense of comfort derived from the identification with larger cultural signifiers."

Learn more about Erin Belanger at www.erinbelanger.ca

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Daniel J. Kirk

Based on community dialogue, artist Daniel J. Kirk’s urbanized BuY-productZ is a compelling and playful work exploring issues related to our urban environment. Daniel uses colour, humour and the creative organization of found materials to focus on Calgary, community and urban by-products.

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Terry Reynoldson

Rush Hour is a collaborative project originating from a unique program organized by Prospect called Studio C, an integrated Community Art and Resource Centre bringing together artists with and without disabilities. Local artist Terry Reynoldson worked with Studio C to create a dynamic installation about our shared experiences with others, both physical and emotional.

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Doug Driediger

Doug's The 12 depicts friends and family with attributes assigned to the original Twelve Apostles. Driediger explains, "Although each character manifests a halo, the characters are still very much ordinary people, as were the original 12."

Consisting of twelve portraits painted in the style of icon paintings, this vibrant display will change over the course of the exhibition run rotating each month with four new portraits. Residing in Calgary, Driediger is an Honours graduate from the Alberta College of Art and Design.

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Sarah Fuller

In Calgary Dream Log, Sarah Fuller combines the dreams submitted by Calgarians into a stream of conscious text to create a collaborative narrative of one night's dreaming in our city. Focusing on the transcription of events and emotions, Fuller uses text to explore the cognitive processes connected to dreams. According to the artist, "The work will represent an alternate reality within the city. Each day the citizens of Calgary go about their everyday lives – somewhat rationally and routinely, but at night the consciousness of the city transforms to that of fantastical and unpredictable." Fuller is a graduate of the Emily Carr College of Art and Design and currently lives and works in Banff.

Dreams, the subconscious and altered states are present in all aspects of Sarah Fuller's art production. These recurring themes weave themselves through her work, surfacing in explorations of place, memory and collaborative narratives. Through the language of art, the subconscious mind and its expression of dreams are made tangible. One of Sarah's main concerns is the role of artist as observer – not only in the world around her, but of the memory and of both the lived and  dream experience. Sarah is interested in the cognitive processes connected to methodology and making the intangible tangible through visual documentation and cataloguing.

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Sponsor

McLennan Ross LLP

With kind assistance from sponsor McLennan Ross LLP, The City of Calgary is pleased to present a chance for local artists to show their work in a highly visible downtown location.

Copyright notice

All photos and images on the City of Calgary's Public Art Project website are copyright protected. Please see our copyright notice for more information. ​​