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Improving road safety for motorists, pedestrians and cyclists

The Calgary Transportation Plan (CTP) is a long-term policy document that directs the development of our city’s transportation system over the next ​60 years. One of the goals identified in the CTP is to promote safety for all transportation system users.

Transportation collision and safety trends

The City uses collision data and trends as one of many inputs to assess the safety performance of our road system, and to determine and prioritize projects aimed to improve safety for all road users.

Based on data collected by the Calgary Police Service and additional analysis*, we know that Calgary’s road safety record has improved over the past 10 years—collision and casualty rates among motorists, pedestrians and cyclists continue to decrease. Compared to other Canadian cities, Calgary has one of the lowest transportation-related casualty rates.

Colli​sion rate on roadway​s has decreased by 15% since 2002. ​​​ Collisions​ happen most often during the noon hour and between 5-6 p.m. ​​
​​​ In 2011, the highest number of collisions occured in January, February and November. ​​​ Overall injury and fatality rate on roadways has declined by 51% over the past 10 years.
Pedestrian injury and fatality rate has decreased by 36% over the past 10 years.​ ​​ ​Cycling injury and fatality rate has decreased by 42% since 2002.
Calgary has one of the lowest collision injury and fatality rates among Canadian cities. ​ ​​​ ​More than 20% of all casualties are pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists.
Source: 2011 Collision Information, Transportation Planning – Data Division

Reducing collisions and improving safety

Each year, The City undertakes a number of projects to improve road safety for all users. Some examples include:

Additional City policies and programs that help enhance road safety include:

*Note: The data is based on reportable collisions collected by the Calgary Police Service (CPS) for enforcement and legal purposes. Current legislation in Alberta states that all roadway collisions resulting in death, injury, or property damage over $2,000 are reportable, an increase from $1,000 prior to January 1, 2011. Additional criteria may be considered during data analysis, resulting in minor differences from CPS data. The City releases this information in good faith, but provides no warranty, nor accepts any liability arising from any incorrect, incomplete, or misleading information or its improper use.