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Calgary Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee

What is CAUAC?

CAUAC is a collaborative effort between The City of Calgary and the Indigenous community to address and resolve issues pertaining to urban Aboriginal residents.

It is a initiative that sparked from the aboriginal population growth of the 1970's in Calgary and during that time it became apparent to Aboriginal leadership and Calgary City Council that a cooperative effort should be made towards addressing the social conditions of the Aboriginal community.

Mission

The Calgary Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee is authorized, on behalf of City Council, to investigate areas of concern to people of Aboriginal ancestry and to make recommendations on policies. These recommendations are meant to help give urban Aboriginal people a more meaningful role within the governance of The Calgary community.

The Committee strives to improve the opportunities and the quality of life of Aboriginal people living in The City of Calgary. Its membership includes both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

History

In 1979, the Native Urban Affairs Committee was established to represent Aboriginal issues and concerns. In 1987, the Committee's name was changed to the Calgary Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee.

In June 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission released 94 calls to action for all Canadians to respond to.

In July 2015, Council asked CAUAC to review the 94 calls to action and provide a report that takes into consideration how to respond locally. CAUAC developed the   White Goose Flying Report, a local adaptation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report. It identified 18 calls to action that can be influenced locally.

In 2017, City Council adopted the Indigenous Policy Framework to help guide The City’s efforts to be responsive to the White Goose Flying Report and the needs of Indigenous people in Calgary.

CAUAC Achievements

Since 1979, the Calgary Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee has addressed issues in the areas of education, employment and training, child welfare, income security, health, Aboriginal women, Aboriginal/police relations and human rights. Other accomplishments include:

Forum for Public Presentation

The Committee receives information, reports, or complaints from individuals, groups and organizations who are concerned with Aboriginal issues. You may contact Lorna Crowshoe of The City of Calgary, Calgary Neighbourhoods for further information.

Want to join the Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee?

Read the committee's Terms of Reference.

If you are interested in applying to sit on the Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee, please visit the Committee web page for more information on the committee and how to apply.