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Cycling signs, road markings and traffic signals


Bicycle signs and traffic signals along bike routes support both people cycling and driving to share the road safely. Some are in the form of street signs, some are road markings (paint) and others are custom traffic signals created for those on bicycle. The meaning of each is explained below.

If you're a driver, the signs and road markings that apply specifically to you are available at Cycling information for drivers.

Cycling signs


 
  • Riding on the sidewalk is allowed wherever this sign is posted.
  • People cycling must yield to people on foot.
  • Note: anyone riding a bicycle who is 14 years old or younger is allowed to ride on city sidewalks, at any time.
 
  • Posted sign and pavement markings designate on-street space for people cycling.
  • Drivers are not permitted to park or drive in bicycle lanes, but may turn across them to access an alley, driveway or other driving space.
  • Drivers must signal before crossing the bike lane and yield to cyclists.
 
  • Indicates drivers are allowed to turn across a cycle track to access an alley, driveway or intersection.
  • Drivers must signal before crossing the bike lane and yield to people cycling.
 
  • Reminds drivers to watch for two-way bicycle traffic when entering a street.
 
  • Indicates a bicycle/pedestrian crossing is ahead.
  • Drivers must yield to anyone in the crosswalk.
 
  • Indicates the street is one-way for drivers, but cyclists can travel in either direction in the designated cycling space.

Bicycle road markings


Green dashed lines

  • Indicates a high congestion point for people cycling, walking and driving.
  • Reminds drivers to watch for and yield to other road users when turning.

Green bike boxes at intersections

  • Designated on-street space for people cycling to reposition their bikes when changing direction.
  • They’re a safe alternative to crossing traffic when making a right or left turn.
  • A white painted line behind the box indicates where drivers are to stop so they don’t block the bike box.

Cycling traffic signals




 
  • New bicycle signals are installed at some intersections.

 



 
  • At some intersections, people cycling are instructed to follow the pedestrian signals.

 



 
  • People cycling and driving follow the same traffic signal.

 

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