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Event Centre FAQs

Quick links to FAQ topics

The following FAQs were drafted based on the report going to Council. Where we can, we will hyperlink to the report and web pages for more context and background.

Through 2021, The City of Calgary has continued to work with Calgary Sport and Entertainment (CSEC) and Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC) to address some items that were identified by the design process and discussions among the partners. As a result, we’re excited to say we have reduced risk to The City and taxpayers, while providing a building that will support our downtown’s transformation, grow our local arts and entertainment talent, and attract more international events to Calgary. 

What are the next steps, based on Council’s decision?

Administration will work with CSEC to finalize, execute and sign the definitive agreements.

In late July, the design plan for development permit submission will be finalized.

In early August, the Event Centre Development Permit application will be submitted.

Current plans provide for a late 2021 December construction start, and 2024 August occupancy.

A development management transition plan is underway.

What items are included in City Additional Costs, as defined “up to $10 million”?

  • Off-site levies paid for by The City
  • Flood mitigation measures

What is a Rivers District mobility and event management plan?

It is a transportation study (Attachment 3) and plan that will result in recommendations to properly manage the high volume of people travelling to and from the Event Centre and the River’s District area, and through the area before and after events. 

Why is CSEC the Event Centre development manager, instead of CMLC, and what does that mean?

CSEC will have more control over the project through the appointment of a new development manager (Attachment 2) – CSE Development Management Corporation – and an amended project decision-making structure.

This level of control is appropriate because they have taken an increased financial responsibility share and are responsible for cost over-runs.

Decisions on items such as project budget, schedule, and construction will be made by CSEC.

Decisions on items such as material design changes, building structure and other elements important to City vision and policy, and project fundamental principles, will be made jointly between The City and CSEC.

As the previous Event Centre development manager, CMLC has a history of delivering best in class and award-winning projects for Calgary. They brought this same attention and team to leading and guiding the Event Centre project over the past 20 months. Along with many other accomplishments, a building design, which creates a valuable addition to and aligns with the Culture + Entertainment District, had the development permit submitted for on Aug. 3, 2021.

Why did the Event Centre budget change?

Ongoing design work since 2019 concluded the building design required further changes to meet the needs of people using the visiting the building:

  • Required seat count
  • Improved accessibility
  • Increased patron to washroom ratio
  • Street level retail
  • Enhanced performance spaces
  • Improvements to public realm and architecture and visual design

The new building budget estimate is $608.5 million. The original budget estimate was $550 million.

For the past six months, along with CMLC as development manager, The City of Calgary and CSEC have come to an agreement on the new budget and funding, which minimizes using additional public funds.

What are the costs to The City?

The partners have refined the budget estimate, found other revenue sources, and minimized the use of further public funds. The result is an arrangement where CSEC and The City share costs 50:50, up to a $575 million budget amount.

CSEC is responsible for 100% of all costs above $575 million, including potential Additional Contributions above $608.5 million.

The table below outlines The City’s funding commitment to the Event Centre project:

  • Building and public space: $275 million
  • Additional contributions, originally approved by Council in 2019: $12.5 million
  • Demolition of the Saddledome: $12.4 million
  • Flood mitigation and off-site levies, originally approved by Council in 2019: $10 million
  • Transaction costs: $3 million
  • Mobility and Event Management Plan (transportation study): TBD based on transportation study result

How is The City paying for its share of the Event Centre?

Funding has already been approved and allocated (Attachment 4) from existing reserves and capital funding sources:

  • Major Capital Projects Reserve
  • Interest Income from the Major Capital Projects Reserve
  • One Calgary Capital restricted funding sources
  • Asset Optimization
  • Real Estate Services Reserve
  • Interest income from the Fiscal Stability Reserve
  • Corporate Programs Savings
  • Fiscal Stability Reserve
  • Interest Income from the Major Capital Projects Reserve

What are the financial returns and benefits to The City?

The overall projected returns (Attachment 5) for The City over 35 years is $411.4 million (increases from 2019 estimate at $400.3M). This projection includes direct and indirect benefits, based on 35 years and does not include inflation, changes to tax rates or extenuating circumstances.

  • $159.9 million (increase from $155.1M): facility fee on all CSEC & third-party events in the Event Centre
  • $146.5 million (increase from $138.7M): incremental River’s District property tax
  • $75 million: support to local community sports organizations
  • $18 million (increase from $19.4M): street-facing retail property taxes
  • $9.5 million: Community engagement programming at the Event Centre
  • $2.5 million: naming rights to building

Has the City of Calgary, on behalf of Calgary’s taxpayers and citizens, negotiated within the 2019 Council-approved/endorsed framework?

First and foremost, The City is working within parameters of the Event Centre’s Project Framework Agreement. The City has been working with Calgary Sport and Entertainment and Calgary Municipal Land Corporation to ensure the project is being managed within the Project Framework Agreement. The result has led to honouring our original funding agreement on behalf of taxpayers, with no impact to taxes or services to citizens.

Does the Event Centre align with Council’s Citizen priorities?

Yes, the Event Centre fits with Council’s Citizen priorities “a city of safe and inspiring neighbourhoods” and “a prosperous city”.  

Will there be impacts to city services or increases in taxes from constructing and operating the Event Centre?

No. There will be no impacts to city services or increases in taxes from constructing and operating the Event Centre. 

The Event Centre agreements


Who is managing the development of the Event Centre?

CSEC will be responsible for the project management of the Event Centre through the appointment of a new development manager –CSE Development Management Corporation – and an amended project decision-making structure. They are also taking on increased financial responsibility share and are responsible for cost over-runs.

Decisions on items such as project budget, schedule, and construction will be made by CSEC.

Decisions on items such as material design changes, building structure and other elements important to City vision and policy, and project fundamental principles, will be made jointly between The City and CSEC.

As the previous Event Centre development manager, CMLC has a history of delivering best in class and award-winning projects for Calgary.  They brought this same attention and team to leading and guiding the Event Centre project over the past 20 months. Along with many other accomplishments, they have seen this project through to buildingdesign which aligns swith the Culture + Entertainment District.

What are the details of the operating agreement?

The City of Calgary and Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation (CSEC) and its affiliates have entered into a 35-year Management and Lease agreement. This agreement will see Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation (CSEC) and its affiliates responsible for 100 per cent of the operating, maintenance and repair costs, other than major structural repairs.

Who will own the Event Centre?

The City will own 100 per cent of the Event Centre.

Why is this arrangement only for a 35-year term? How can we make sure the Event Centre lasts longer than that?

Both The City of Calgary and Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation and its affiliates agree to maximize the useful life of the Event Centre. The agreements have several provisions intended to maximize the life of the Event Centre. For example, there are incentives for Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation and its affiliates to fund major capital improvements which extend the Event Centre’s useful life and the initial term beyond 35 years.

Can the Flames relocate during the 35-year lease?

Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation and its affiliates has agreed not to relocate the Flames during the construction period or the 35-year lease term that follows the construction period.

What are the Calgary Sports and Entertainment (CSEC) land options?

As identified in the Event Centre Agreement, The City of Calgary has given CSEC the option to acquire certain lands in the Rivers District at a price equal to fair market value. One of sites is the Victoria Park Transit Centre, also known as the “bus barns,” and gives CSEC the first right of refusal for 10 years from the date of the Event Centre completion. The City of Calgary is under no obligation to make either of those sites available for development during this time.

How did The City arrive at some of the transaction terms?

The agreements between The City, Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation and its affiliates and the Calgary Stampede are the result of extensive and comprehensive negotiations amongst the parties reflecting the bargaining that one would expect to occur between arms-length parties. The City was focused on ensuring its strategic and commercial interests were protected while acting with integrity and respect. The negotiations were intended to achieve a resolution to all material deal points and to do so on a "package deal" basis with a view to preserving The City's position. The transaction must be viewed as a comprehensive package deal.

Definitive agreements have been signed amongst the three parties: by The City with each of Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation and its affiliates and the Stampede, as well as agreements between Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation and its affiliates and the Stampede, to which The City is not party. The City has posted copies of City agreements related to design, construction and use of the Event Centre on the agreements page.

Investment


Why is The City investing in an Event Centre at this time?

The City of Calgary remains committed to the economic growth of our city on behalf of citizens, communities, businesses and customers. We continue to reduce the cost of government while investing in the future of Calgary.

The Event Centre is more than an arena. The Event Centre is a catalyst for attracting private sector investment into the area and the development of under-utilized lands. The vision for the Event Centre design is to create a stronger integration into the community and interaction with the streets and public spaces to create a variety of public experiences for citizens to enjoy.

The Event Centre contributes to outcomes identified in the Downtown Strategy, and is critical to realize the vision of east Victoria Park as a Culture + Entertainment District that will add to the cultural vitality of our city. The Event Centre project is also a great opportunity for the coordinated development of major building projects expected to accelerate the revitalization of the Rivers District, East Victoria Park and downtown.

How much has The City committed to investing in the Event Centre Project?

The City is committed to investing $312.9M to the overall project. This includes:

  • Building and public space, originally approved by Council in 2019: $275 million
  • Additional contributions, originally approved by Council in 2019: $12.5 million
  • Demolition of the Saddledome and land remediation, originally approved by Council in 2019: $12.4 million
  • Flood mitigation and off-site levies, originally approved by Council in 2019: $10 million
  • Transaction costs, originally approved by Council in 2019: $3 million
  • Mobility and Event Management Plan (transportation study): TBD based on transportation study result

The partners have refined the budget estimate, found other revenue sources, and minimized the use of further public funds. The result is an arrangement where CSEC and The City share costs 50:50, up to a $575 million budget amount.

CSEC is responsible for 100% of all costs above $575 million, including potential Additional Contributions above $608.5 million.

Will our property taxes increase, or city services reduce to build a new Event Centre?

No. There will be no increase to property taxes or decrease in City services from the design, construction and operation of the Event Centre. The City’s share of the investment will come from the following sources:

  • Major Capital Projects Reserve 
  • Interest Income from the Major Capital Projects Reserve 
  • One Calgary Capital restricted funding sources 
  • Asset Optimization 
  • Real Estate Services Reserve 
  • Interest income from the Fiscal Stability Reserve 
  • Corporate Programs Savings 
  • Fiscal Stability Reserve 
  • Interest Income from the Major Capital Projects Reserve 

Location


Why is east Victoria Park a good location for a new Event Centre?

East Victoria Park and the surrounding area of Stampede Park is a master planned area that is envisioned as Calgary’s Culture + Entertainment District. It is the ideal location because it meets the needs of Calgary:

  • It is already home to the Saddledome.
  • It has the necessary infrastructure to support an event centre.
  • It is within walking distance to many culture and entertainment venues such as Stampede Park, BMO Centre, Arts Commons, the new Central Library and the National Music Centre.
  • It supports the long-term vision set out in the Council-approved Rivers District Master Plan and contributes to the greater vision for east Victoria Park as a Culture + Entertainment District.
  • It acts as an anchor to support future development outlined in the Downtown Strategy.
  • It is near the existing Red and Blue lines of the LRT and will be close to the new Green Line.
  • It will be adjacent to a planned 5 Street S.E. underpass to support pedestrian and vehicle traffic and the planned 17th Avenue SE Extension to connect the district to the existing 17th Avenue business and retail corridor.
  • It will be a gateway into the Culture + Entertainment District and Stampede Park.

The City of Calgary has already made major investments in infrastructure and local area enhancements over the last 10 years.

What happens to the Saddledome after the Event Centre is constructed?

The Saddledome was built for the 1988 Winter Olympic Games. It has served Calgary well but is aging. The Saddledome will be demolished after occupancy of the new Event Centre.

Mobility


What is a Mobility & Event Management Plan?

The Mobility and Event Management Plan will support and supplement the experiences of patrons, residents, employers, fans, and visitors to the Event Centre and the Rivers District as they travel to and from events. The Plan will look to balance the needs of the vision for the District with the need to create and maintain a positive travel journey as part of the total fan experience. 

Who is leading the Mobility & Event Management Plan (the Plan) development?

The Plan development is led by The City of Calgary, in collaboration and cooperation with Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation (CSEC), Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC), the Calgary Stampede (CS), and key landowners and stakeholders within the District.  

What does a ‘30-minute dump’ time mean?

A key measure of the plan is to achieve a target “dump time” of 30 minutes. This is the maximum time targeted to exit the District from a parking lot exit point after an event. To achieve this target, a plan that balances all mobility modes (walking, wheeling, vehicular, public transit and ride share) will be required.  

How does 17 Avenue S.E. extension factor into the Plan?

The 17 Avenue SE extension, connecting Macleod Trail to Stampede Trail SE (4 Street SE) is expected to provide a key access point for all travel modes, allowing for efficient movement of people accessing and egressing the District to the west, as well as improves access to the Victoria Park / Stampede LRT station.  The construction is anticipated to be complete in 2024, in conjunction with the completion of the BMO Centre expansion project.  

Do we currently know of other projects required to support the Plan?

Yes. A second access for the District will be required connecting 11 Avenue S.E. to 9 Avenue S.E. to support the Plan. This connection is currently planned as an underpass connecting 11 Avenue S.E. to 9 Avenue S.E. along a future 5 Street S.E. alignment, below the Canadian Pacific (CP) Railway. 

In collaboration with the stakeholders, the Plan is expected to review and assess the location of the new connection to 9 Avenue SE that best balances the needs of the District, the Plan, and future development needs of the area. The Plan will also help determine when the connection will be needed. 

How much funding is required and where will it come from?

Based on the information we have today (a Class 5 estimate), an initial investment for the Plan is anticipated to be up to $10 million. This funding will be a part of a 2022 budget ask and will be discussed at Council in November 2021, if required.

Investments will likely include street and lane-use control signals (facilitate lane reversals or closures, traffic management, etc.), signage and wayfinding, and other transit, active modes or mobility needs to support flow of people accessing, egressing, and within the District.  

Who will manage and operate the Plan when it is carried out?

The City of Calgary and CSEC agree to each be responsible for 50% of the Plan management and operating costs for the full term of the agreement, above the initial annual cost of $200,000 that is currently paid for by CSEC. 

When will this Plan be complete?

While there are a number of projects already underway in the in the area like, BMO expansion (2024), Victoria Park Stampede LRT rebuild (2024), and the Event Centre (2024) mobility work will need to be done in consideration of the Green Line project. The Green Line project does not have an expected completion date at this time. The completion of the Greenline will be an important component of overall mobility for the district. 

Benefits


How will the Event Centre benefit Calgarians?

The Event Centre is a strategic investment in our city’s future, a partnership with long-term public benefit. These benefits include:

  • Attracting and retaining young talent in a re-energized, entrepreneurial and socially vibrant city.
  • Calgary being included in tours by world-leading performing artists, major events and festivals.
  • Solidifying Calgary’s place as a major destination for visitors from around the world.
  • Creating another exciting place for Calgarians to gather, strengthen relationships and celebrate.
  • The Event Centre being a catalyst for attracting private sector investment to the district and the development of under-used lands. Other projects that will benefit the area include the BMO Centre expansion currently underway, Victoria Park Stampede LRT Station upgrades, as well as construction of a festival space on Stampede Trail that Calgary Municipal Land Corporation and its affiliates will construct for use by Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation and its affiliates, the Calgary Stampede, The City and community organizations.
  • Community sports organizations receiving a contribution from The Flames Foundation of $1.5 million (escalating at 2 per cent for inflation) each year over the lease term.
  • The City receiving some access to the Event Centre for public events.
  • Revenues and benefits are defined in the signed agreements. This includes tax revenue that will be generated from the street-facing retail portion of the Event Centre and other developments in the Rivers District.

Social and community benefits

Literature from studies and other jurisdictions suggest the following:

  • A majority of event centre users and non-users agree that sports teams generate civic pride for their city (Groothuis, Johnson & Whitehead, 2004)
  • Civic pride, reputation and image created by sports teams are important factors for a city’s overall development (Swindell & Rosentraub, 1998)
  • Social impact - communal experience, pride and sense of belonging, identifying with a local team, enthusiasm when a major sporting event is held in your hometown
  • Community visibility and image impacts - benefits from the city being associated with a major sports team/facility (increases a city’s visibility and image)
  • Developmental impact - the redevelopment of the area immediately surrounding the sport facility district. (Grieve & Sherry 2012)
  • Professional sports organizations have recognized the importance of drawing new Canadians to their teams as fans, both in the stands and at home watching television (Institute for Canadian Citizenship, 2014)

Sport and recreation contribute to:

  • Community health and wellbeing
  • Confidence-building and empowerment
  • Social integration and cohesion
  • National and cultural identity

Reduction in crime and vandalism (Grieve & Sherry, 2012)

What are the social impacts of building the Event Centre?

The EY Economic Impact Assessment (along with literature reviews) shared with Council on January 28, 2019, looked at the social benefits associated with the Event Centre. While harder to quantify, social benefits such as the development of the “experience economy” where individuals can live, work and access entertainment within close proximity, contribute to the overall development opportunity.

Social benefits can also have a broader impact in the areas of:

  1. Cultural development – improving Calgary’s reputation as a city of choice for employers, visitors and citizens.
  2. Social – the creation of public spaces and the relationships built through public gatherings.
  3. Tourism – diversity of experiences that drive related spends in food and beverage, hotels etc.
  4. Civic Pride – associated with sports teams and cultural diversity.

Public engagement


How has the public been engaged on the Event Centre?

In 2018, Calgarians were engaged by Calgary Municipal Land Corporation on the topic of an Event Centre within the greater context of the Rivers District Master Plan.

  • Calgary Municipal Land Corporation held engagements at various events across the city. The engagement was supported through extensive promotion, both paid and earned media, for over 100 days of active engagement. As a result, over 6,000 Calgarians participated directly in the engagement sessions on the issue, and over 120,000 pieces of information were collected.

In 2019, Council received almost 5,200 submissions received from the public regarding the Event Centre. The City of Calgary reviewed the submissions and posted all comments received from the public. All comments received have had personal information removed in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

Through the Event Centre Assessment Committee, the public has been informed of the engagement process through periodic public meetings that detailed the progress of the committee's work.

In early 2020, Calgary Municipal Land Corporation conducted public engagement on the overall design of the facility, and its integration into the broader district. This included opportunities to incorporate dynamic programming around the facility in areas like the adjacent Festival Street.

Engagement explored the areas of:

  • Facility design and its connectivity to public spaces like the envisioned Festival Street along Stampede Trail.
  • Opportunities for programming and activation of the facility and the broader Culture and Entertainment District, including reconciliation to the programing likely to evolve from the BMO Centre.
  • Urban Design and streetscaping around the Event Centre to integrate and enhance synergies between nearby amenities like the BMO Expansion, Stampede Park and the character areas of the Rivers District.

Engagement stared in January 2020 and concluded in May 2020 with a final report, released by the Calgary Municipal Land Corporation. The inclusive outreach program engaged residents, business interests, development community members, key stakeholders and partners, and the broader public in the process.

Other


How are lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic being applied to this project?

Accessibility and health will be key considerations for the design of the Event Centre. While we aren’t yet able to predict how COVID will impact the functionality of large public facilities like the Event Centre, we are in the early planning stages of this project where those types of considerations will be included.​

Project milestones


Date Milestone

Aug. 16, 2021

The amended agreements are released. 

Aug. 3, 2021

Development Permit application submitted. View application details

July 30, 2021

The City of Calgary and Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation (CSEC), sign four new agreements.

July 28, 2021

Council approved the terms of the amended agreement.

July 26, 2021

An Event Centre update (C2021-1164) is posted. It will be discussed at Council this week.

April 14, 2021

Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC) issued a statement on the status of the project.

July 10, 2020

The Event Centre public engagement results were released by Calgary Municipal Corporation (CMLC). As the project development manager, CMLC held a series of engagement events (January – March 2020) to gather Calgarians’ input into the design and function of the facility and surrounding public spaces. Read the full report.

June 24, 2020

Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC) announced the Primary Design Consultants, (PDC), Construction Management (CM) and speciality firms for the Event Centre.

Jan. 13, 2020

Major agreements to which The City of Calgary is party to are released, along with a citizen summary of the terms, principles and benefits of these agreements. Learn more about the agreements.

Dec. 5, 2019

The City of Calgary, Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation (CSEC), the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede Limited (Stampede), and Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC) sign definitive agreements, that will see the construction of a new Event Centre in east Victoria Park.

July 30, 2019

Council received into its Corporate Record almost 5,200 submissions received from the public regarding the Event Centre. The City of Calgary reviewed the submissions and posted all comments received from the public. The posted submissions were received by the City Clerk’s Office between July 22, 2019 at 7:13 p.m. to July 29, 2019 at 1:51 p.m. All comments received have had personal information removed in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

July 29, 2019

City Council votes on whether to ratify the agreements.

July 22 to July 28, 2019

7-day public comment period.

July 22, 2019

  • The City of Calgary and Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation (CSEC) agree to fundamental terms and conditions for the development and construction of a new Event Centre in East Victoria Park.
  • The City and the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede (CES) agree to fundamental terms and conditions for a land exchange to support construction of the Event Centre and demolition of the Saddledome.

Jan. 28, 2019

  • Council adopted a Workplan for a potential Event Centre. Full plan

Jan. 25, 2019

Ernst & Young presented the Economic Impact Assessment Study on the Rivers District Revitalization to Committee.  They found that "Having gathered the appropriate data for the three proposed projects, the quantitative modelling results project a positive economic impact, both during construction and in ongoing operations."  Full report.

Dec.14, 2018

Committee heard from Ernst & Young, who spoke about the methodology of an Economic Impact Assessment on the Rivers District revitalization, which include the Event Centre, BMO Expansion, and Arts Commons renovations.

Oct.9, 2018

Council directed the Event Centre Assessment Committee, on behalf of The City, to re-engage in partnership conversations with Calgary Sport and Entertainment Corporation (CSES) regarding a new Event Centre within the culture and entertainment district.

Oct. 5, 2018

The Committee received a report from the Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC) that detailed the vision for the Cultural and Entertainment District, with renderings of a proposed Event Centre. Full report.

July 30, 2018

The Event Centre Assessment Committee adopted the following principles to be included in the Terms of Reference. They are:

  1. The Event Centre should be a gathering place for all Calgarians that includes, but not be limited to: concerts, assemblies, festivals, professional and amateur sports, linked to an outdoor gathering space.
  2. Public funds must be used for public benefit, including but not limited to improving access and availability for individuals and groups, while also providing economic benefits for the Calgary economy.
  3. The Event Centre must be a catalyst to attract further vibrancy and investment as an anchor for further development in a mixed-use neighbourhood.
  4. The Event Centre must be viable and sustainable as its own entity while contributing as part of a comprehensive master plan vision that supports The City of Calgary's planning objectives and enhances our communities' brand and reputation.
  5. It is understood that a proposed Event Centre could be a partnership between The City of Calgary and external parties.
  6. Although negotiations will be kept private, there will be engagement with the public throughout the process whenever possible to ensure transparency.
  7. In the event that a funding agreement for an Event Centre is reached between The City of Calgary and external groups, it must be made public and presented to Council for final decision.

The Committee also received an update from Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC) on public engagement related to Victoria Park.

June 25, 2018

The Terms of Reference for the Event Centre Assessment Committee were adopted. These terms include the mandate, composition and governance of the Committee.

May 28, 2018

The Event Centre Assessment Committee was established, with Councillor Jeff Davison as Chair, and Councillor Ward Sutherland as Vice-Chair.  Councillor Shane Keating joined as an additional member.

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This information has no legal status and cannot be used as an official interpretation of the various bylaws, codes and regulations currently in effect. The City of Calgary accepts no responsibility to persons relying solely on this information. Web pages are updated periodically. ​

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