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Assessment & Tax Bill

Assessment & Tax Bill

Factors that impact your property tax bill

Your property tax bill is based on the budgetary needs of The City (municipal tax) and The Province (provincial tax) multiplied by the portion allocated to you. Your portion is determined by the value of the property you own in Calgary, which is your property assessment each year.

Municipal tax
In November of each year, Council sets the budget needed to pay for services all Calgarians value and benefit from, including police, transit parks, recreation and more. About half of The City’s budget is supported by property tax, while the remaining half comes from other revenue sources (such as license fees, provincial grants and user fees.

Once Council determines the required tax revenue, it’s allocated to the residential and non-residential properties. About 65 per cent of the property tax collected from property owners is used to deliver City services Calgarians value and need.
Municipal tax rate

Provincial tax
The Provincial budget and property tax rate is set in the spring by the Government of Alberta. The City collects provincial property tax on behalf of the Province and remits it to them annually.

About 35 percent of property tax collected in Calgary goes to the Province.
Provincial tax rate

Property Assessment and the typical market change

Assessments are based on the fair market value of your property last July 1. Real estate data on all properties sold in Calgary in the previous three years are analyzed. Your assessment comes from the analysis of sold properties in your neighbourhood that are very similar to yours.

Assessment includes things like the size of your house, any renovations, the year it was built, the neighbourhood you live in and other variables. All together, they make up the fair market value assessment of your home.

For the 2021, the overall change in the residential market was -2%

How does the overall market change impact your property tax bill?
If your residential property’s approximate year-to-year per cent change in assessment is:

- LESS THAN the typical per cent change (-2%): The portion of property taxes owed will decrease.

In 2020, Arham’s home was assessed at $455,000. This year, his home was assessed at $435,000 meaning it dropped by approximately $20,000 or -4% (less than the typical market change of -2%).

2019 residential property assessment 2020 residential property assessment

$455,000

$435,000

Difference

-$20,000 or -4%

Since the change in the market value of Arham’s home (-4%) was less than the typical market change of -2%, his portion of the property taxes owed will decrease in 2021.

Residential market change is only one factor that impacts Arham’s property tax bill. Any increases or decreases at the provincial or municipal level will still impact his total property tax bill.

- THE SAME as the typical per cent change (-2%): The portion of property taxes owed will stay about the same.

Last year, Suki’s home was assessed at $455,000. This year, her home was assessed at $445,000 meaning it dropped by approximately $10,000 or -2% (equal to the typical market change of -2%).

2020 residential property assessment 2021 residential property assessment

$455,000

$445,000

Difference

-$10,000 or -2%

Since Suki’s home assessment value dropped by -2%, the same as the overall residential market change in 2021, the portion of property tax allocated to her will remain the same.

As noted above, residential market change is only one factor that impacts Suki’s property tax bill. Any increases or decreases at the provincial or municipal level will still impact her total property tax bill.

- MORE THAN the typical per cent change (-2%): The portion of property taxes owed will increase.

Gerry decided to make several home improvements to his property last summer including building a garage. He was surprised this year when he received his assessment because it had dropped by $5,000 to $495,000.

2020 residential property assessment 2021 residential property assessment

$500,000

$495,000

Difference

-$5,000 or -1%

Since Gerry’s property assessment only dropped by -1%, compared to the typical market change of -2%, the portion of tax allocated to his property will increase.

As mentioned, residential market change is only one factor that impacts Gerry’s tax bill. Any increases or decreases at the provincial or municipal level will still impact his total property tax bill.

Get an estimate of your property tax bill

Use our property calculator to estimate what your property tax bill is before it is mailed in late May. The calculator is updated each January and provides a breakdown of all the factors that go into the amount you’ll see on your next tax bill.

Visit calgary.ca/propertytax for further information about how and where to pay your property tax bill or calgary.ca/TIPP to join our monthly Tax Instalment Payment Plan (TIPP).

Learn more how your property tax is calculated

Online tax change calculator

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