Build an addition

Find out more information on permits, application requirements, and common rules.

Before you apply


Use this page to help guide you through submitting a complete application. We will explain when you need a permit, what permits you need, what your application requirements are and go over some common rules relating to your project.

Do you need a permit?

Yes. All additions to your home will always require at least a building permit. An addition is any construction that increases the area of your home, and includes any covered structure, such as a covered deck or porch, attached garage, sunroom, etc.

In addition:

  • If you are replacing or rebuilding some existing exterior walls, this would be included as part of your addition and must clearly be indicated in your submission.
  • If you are replacing or rebuilding all the exterior walls, this is considered a new house, and all applicable permits are required. Visit the new house construction page for more information on building houses in Calgary.

Building safety approval (building permit)

Building safety approval is to make sure that the structure meets building safety requirements. Review the construction (building code information) section of this page for more information.

When do you need additional permits?

You may require additional permits depending on if it meets the rules of the Land Use Bylaw or if you are doing any additional work including electrical or plumbing.

Planning approval (development permit)

If your design or location does not meet land use bylaw specifications, you will also require planning approval (development permit).​​ If your design or location do not meet the Land Use Bylaw rules, a Development Permit will be required. Please note that Development Permits do not guarantee approval.

Some common rules include:

  • The existing building and proposed addition must conform to the rules of the Land Use Bylaw.
  • The building must not be located in the floodway, flood fringe or overland flow area.
  • The building must not be listed on the City’s inventory of evaluated historic resources.
  • Your addition is on the upper floor, does not exceed the existing roof height and is under 10 m².
  • Your addition is on the main floor at the front of the house, does not extend forward more than 1.5 m from the original front facade, meets the corresponding height requirements and is under 40 m².
  • Your addition is on the main floor at the rear of the house, does not extend back more than 4.6 m from the original rear facade, meets the corresponding height requirements and is under 40 m².

To find out what your land use district is and for a list of common rules, read more in the what are the rules section.

Electrical permit

You need a separate electrical permit for all electrical installations and renovations.

If you are doing the work yourself, you may be eligible for a homeowners electrical permit. Review the electrical wiring section of homeowner electrical and plumbing permits for more information.

If you are hiring someone to do the work for you, they will need to apply for the permit. Visit our hiring a contractor page for more information.

If you are a contractor, visit our trade permit contractor page for more information.

Plumbing permit

separate plumbing permit is required for all new plumbing installations, as well as when extending or altering any existing plumbing systems.

For more information about what type of electrical work a homeowner may obtain a permit for, review the homeowners permits eligibility and plumbing permit sections.

For information for contractors, visit the trade permit contractor information page.

How much will it cost?

Building safety approval - building permit Fee schedule Permit fee Safety codes council fee (4%) Total
Addition under 400 square feet

building permit fee schedule

$321 $12.84 $333.84
Addition over 400 square feet

building permit fee schedule

$1252 $50.08 $1302.08

Trade permit fees

Trade permits Fee schedule Permit fee Safety codes council fee (4%) Total
Homeowner electrical permit

building permit fee schedule

$112 $4.50 $116.50
Homeowner plumbing permit

building permit fee schedule

$112 $4.50 $116.50
Contractor trade permit

building permit fee schedule

  -   -

Get a permit fee estimate

Planning Approval

Planning approval - development permit (if applicable) Fee schedule Permit fee Advertising fee Development completion inspection Total
Addition to a manufactured home 10 square meters or less

planning applications fee schedule

$182 - - $182
Addition to a manufactured home greater than 10 square meters

planning applications fee schedule

$295 - $155 $450
Addition to a detached or attached home (2 units or less) that is 10 square meters or less and in the developed area

planning applications fee schedule

$365 $30 - $395
Addition to a detached or attached home (2 units or less) that is greater than 10 square meters and in the developed area

planning applications fee schedule

$590 $30 $155 $775*
Addition with a relaxation to a land use bylaw rule in the developing area

planning applications fee schedule

$365 $30 $155 $550

* An additional $472 service grades fee will be applied to most applications

- - - - -

How do you pay for a permit?

Online submissions

For online submissions you will pay your permit fees in full at the time of your application using a credit card

In person submissions

You will be required to pay in full at the time of your application. You may pay by credit or debit card, cheque or cash.

How long will it take to get a permit?

Timelines indicated are not a guarantee and depend on volumes, application completeness, and the applicant’s timely replies to additional information requests from the City.

Tip: To avoid delays in processing your application, make sure your application includes all the required documents, plans and information listed on the checklist below. 

 

See the tips for a smooth application for details on submitting a complete application.

Building safety approval - building permit Our process Timeline
Addition under 400 square feet Application is reviewed for bylaw and safety codes compliance Approximately 7 days
Addition over 400 square feet Application is reviewed for bylaw and safety codes compliance Approximately 7 days

Planning approval timelines

Planning approval - development permit (if applicable) Our process Timeline

Proposed structures that do not meet all rules of Land Use Bylaw 1P2007

  • 60 days to decision 
  • 21 days advertisement/appeal period
10 - 12 weeks

Review our development permit process page for more information about the planning approval process.

When does your permit expire?

You will receive a permit expiry reminder in the mail. If you need more time, you can extend your permit. Review the extend or reinstate your permit section.

Permit type Expiry (from date of issuance)
Building permit 180 days
Contractor trade permit 330 days
Homeowner permit 330 days
Development permit

Your permit conditions will outline your commencement date. Commencement date is the day you must start construction by for the development permit to be valid. If you do not start construction by that date, you can request an extension of commencement.

Do you need to hire a professional?

If you are hiring someone to do the work for you, they will need to apply for the permit. Visit our hiring a contractor page to review the 5 steps to choosing a contractor.

Professional architects or engineers

An architect or professional engineer may be required to design and inspect your project. Refer to the current National Building Code – Alberta Edition, Division C, Section 2.4.2 or a consultant to determine if professional involvement is required. Where professional involvement is required, plans or documents must be stamped by the corresponding professional(s).​​

If your project requires engineer’s review, then a seal of professional engineer registered to practice in the province of Alberta for the proposed design should be provided. The engineer should be registered with APEGA- The Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Alberta. Please visit APEGA website for professional engineer’s stamp authentication requirements.

What are the rules when designing your project?


The following information will help you prepare your building permit application, and make sure it meets the City’s requirements.

Where are you building?

Where can you build on your property?

Building setbacks

The setback requirements for existing and new structures are the same.

Side setbacks

R-C1, R-C1s, R-C1N, R-C2, R-1, R-1s, R-1N, R-2, R-2M, R-MH, R-CG, R-CGex, R-G, R-Gm

  • For laned properties, both side setbacks must be a minimum of 1.2 m.
  • For properties without a lane or front attached garage, there must be a minimum of 1.2m on one side, and 3m on the other.
  • Side setback requirements vary for corner parcels and parcels with a Maintenance Access Right of Way, also called zero lot lines. Contact the planning services centre if you are unsure of your setback requirements.

R-C1L, R-C1Ls

  • For laned properties, both side setbacks must be a minimum of 2.4m.
  • For properties without a lane or front attached garage, there must be a minimum of 2.4m on one side, and 3m on the other.

Front setback

R-1, R-1s, R-1N, R-2, R-2M, R-G, R-Gm

  • A 3.0 m front setback is required where the property is laned and a 2.0 m setback where it is laneless.

R-C1, R-C1s, R-C1N, R-C2, R-CG, R-CGex

  • If your property is in a developed district, a 1.5 m allowance is subtracted from the contextual front setback to determine the minimum front setback for the proposed addition. However, the front setback cannot be less than 3.0 m.

R-MH

  • A 3.0m front setback is required for manufactured homes located on an individual parcel.

R-C1L, R-C1Ls

  • A minimum of 6.0 m is required for all properties.

Rear setback

R-C1, R-C1s, R-C1N, R-C1L, R-C2, R-1, R-1s, R-1N, R-2, R-2M

  • A minimum of 7.5 m is required for all properties.

R-MH

  • A 3.0 m rear setback is required for manufactured homes located on an individual parcel.

R-CG, R-CGex

  • A 1.2 m rear setback is required for buildings on laned or corner properties.
  • For all other properties, the building setback must be a minimum of 7.5 m.

R-G, R-Gm

  • A minimum of 0.6 m is required for laned parcels if all required parking stalls are provided in a private garage on the property and has direct access to the lane.
  • A minimum of 1.2 m is required when the rear property line is shared with a carriage house lot, if all parking stalls are provided in a private garage on the property.
  • A minimum of 5.0m is required for laneless parcels if all required parking stalls are provided in a private garage on the property.
  • If none of the above apply, the minimum rear setback is 7.5 m.

Projections into setback areas

Projections into setback areas

  • All low-density residential properties must have at least one side setback free and clear of all projections less than 2.4 m above grade, such as cantilevers.
  • The maximum length of any projection in a setback area is 3.1 m.
  • Portions of a building may project 0.6 m into the side setback, while not being located closer than 0.9 m to the nearest front facade. Air conditioning units can project 1.0 m. Window wells can project 0.8 m into any side setback area.
  • Landings and stairs may project into the side setback, if:
    • They provide access to the main or lower floor.
    • The landing area does not exceed 2.5 m2.
    • The landing is accessible from front and back.
    • No more than 1.8 m2 of the landing is in the setback.
  • There cannot be any projections into the 3 m required side setback on properties without a lane or a front attached garage.
  • On a corner parcel, the regular projection rules apply; however, no projection can be located within 3.0 m of the BOW or FOC.

What design rules do you need to meet?

Parcel coverage

Parcel coverage by all buildings cannot exceed a certain percentage of your total property size. This percentage is dictated by your specific land use district​. See the graph below to determine your allowable lot coverage.

Land use district Allowable coverage (%) Parcel area <= 300 m2 parcel width < 10 m2 Parcel area <= 300 m2 parcel width < 8.7 m2 Parcel width > 11 m Semi-detached / duplex Row / townhouse
R-C1L, R-C1Ls 40 x x x x x
R-C1, R-C1s, R-C2, R-1, R-1s, R-MH, R-CG* 45 x x x x x
R-C1N 45 50 x x x x
R-1N 50 x 60 45 x x
R-2 45 x x x 50 x
R-2M 45 x x x 50 60

*Parcel coverage rules for R-CG change as density increases.

Note: If the aggregate area of all accessory buildings is under 10m2, those structures will not contribute to parcel coverage.

To calculate lot coverage, you will need to divide the footprint area of all applicable buildings by the property size.

(Total building area ÷ property area) × 100 = lot coverage per cent

Example:

Use the property information tool and the graph above to figure out the allowable coverage for the property.
R-C1 = 45%

Calculate the property area
10.36 m × 32.0 m = 331.52 m2
Add all applicable building areas:
house: 77.2 m2
covered deck: 9.3 m2
shed: 10.2 m2
garage: 40.8 m2
Total building area = 137.5 m2

Divide the total building area by the property area and times that by 100 to get a percentage.

[(total building area = 137.5 m2) / (property area = 331.52 m2)] X 100 = 41.47%

R-C1 allows for a maximum lot coverage of 45 per cent. Therefore, the proposal comes within the allowable lot coverage.​​​​

Note: In some districts, the maximum parcel coverage must be reduced by 21.0 square meters for each required parking stall that is not provided in a private attached, or detached garage.

Construction information (building code) to consider when designing your building

New window or enlarging a window

If the proposed window is located within a bedroom, egress requirements in the National Building Code (Alberta Edition) must be met. For a comprehensive explanation of these requirements, please see egress window guidelines.

Note: Engineering may be required for structural alterations. Contact our technical assistance centre for more information​.

New window or enlarging a window​

Windows are generally not permitted in an exterior wall when that wall is closer than 1.2 m (4’- 0”) to any property line.

When adding new exterior windows to your concrete foundation wall, a professional Engineer’s structural review is required when one or more of the following applies:

  • The width of a new opening exceeds 1.2m (4’-0”).
  • The combined width of all new and existing openings in one wall exceeds 25% of the overall length of that wall.
  • The width of solid wall which remains between an existing opening and a new opening is less than the width of either of those openings.

Refer to Division B, 9.15.4.3. of the  National Building Code – Alberta Edition for more information.

New basement entry

When adding new exterior doors to your concrete foundation wall, a professional Engineer’s structural review is required when one or more of the following applies:

  • The width of a new opening exceeds 1.2m (4’-0”).
  • The combined width of all new and existing openings in one wall exceeds 25% of the overall length of that wall.
  • The width of solid wall which remains between an existing opening and a new opening is less than the width of either of those openings.
  • The door is fully or partially in a pre-engineered tall wall. 

Refer to Division B, 9.15.4.3. and Division C, Section 2.4.2 of the National Building Code – Alberta Edition for more information.

Roof soffits

Roof soffits are not permitted within 0. 45 m (1’6”) of the property line.

Roof soffits within 1.2 m (4’- 0”) of any property line are not allowed to have any openings and must be a non-vented soffit. The soffit material can be either:

  • sheet steel
  • unvented aluminum
  • ½” gypsum soffit or ceiling board
  • ½” plywood
  • ½” Orientated Strand Board (OSB) or waferboard
  • ½” lumber

Smoke and carbon monoxide detector requirements

Smoke detectors are required in all bedrooms and hallways servicing bedrooms. They must be hard-wired and interconnected throughout the house. If there are no hallways servicing bedrooms in your basement, smoke detectors are required within common areas.

Refer to Division B, 9.10.19.  for smoke detector and Division B, 9.32.3.9. for carbon monoxide detector in National Building Code – Alberta Edition.

Energy efficiency requirements

Your renovation may be required to meet energy efficiency requirements under Section 9.36 of the Alberta Building Code.

  • If the application for the building of the house was submitted on or after Nov. 1, 2016 any new renovations must comply with these energy efficiency requirements.
  • If the application for the building of the house was submitted before Nov. 1, 2016 you do not need to comply with the energy efficiency requirements of Section 9.36 of the Alberta Building Code.

All renovations to your home must include building construction and mechanical components (furnaces, air conditioners, water heaters, etc.) that perform as well as, or better than, any similar existing construction or mechanical components that are in the home or that are being replaced. All changes must also meet applicable National Building Code (Alberta Edition) requirements.

New heating, ventilation, air conditioning and service water heating systems are always required to be properly certified.

New work and replacement of "like for like" mechanical components and systems normally requires building, gas and/or electrical permits. Please see the Alberta Permit Regulation and the Calgary Building Permit Bylaw for details.

When maintaining and repairing building components or mechanical components in homes, replacements are allowed as long as you replace the component with a similar material or part that performs as well as, or better than, what you are replacing. This includes exterior cladding, windows, doors, mechanical systems, etc.

Door widths requirements

Mechanical room: Your mechanical/furnace room or laundry room is required a minimum 32" wide door.  All doorways that lead to this room must also be minimum 32" in width.

Washroom: Doorways to rooms with a bathtub, shower or water closet should be a minimum of 30” wide.

Radon

Radon is a naturally occurring gas that is invisible, odourless and tasteless. When diluted by the air around us, it does not cause problems. However, when concentrated in an enclosed space, it has been linked to serious health issues.

To test for radon in your home, you can purchase a do-it yourself test or hire a radon professional. Once your basement has been tested, if it shows that the levels of radon are above the health canada threshold of 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq/m3) then a radon remediation system could be installed. For more information, visit health canada's guide for radon measurements in residential dwellings (homes).

A radon remediation system rough-in installation is not a building code requirement for existing homes. If you are adding to the footprint of your home, then a radon remediation system rough-in is required for the addition. Review our additions page for more information.

For more information on radon mitigation, contact health canada.

If you have questions regarding installation requirements for your radon rough-in, contact the technical assistance centre.

New home buyer protection

A new Home Buyer Warranty may be required if your addition is 75 per cent or more of the existing house square footage. For more information about the warranty in reference to additions, see the reconstruction bulletin on Alberta Municipal Affairs Registrar Bulletins page. Visit the new home warranties page or call 1-866-421-6929 for general information.

Building code questions

If you have questions or need clarification on the Building code information above, contact the technical assistance centre.

For all other inquiries contact our planning services centre.

Homeowner trade permits


Homeowner permit eligibility

If you are a homeowner, you may to apply for homeowner's plumbing, electrical and gas fireplace installation permits for new work, including renovations, if: 

  • You legally own the home - if you have recently purchased the property, it takes some time for the title to transfer to you. We may request a copy of your purchase agreement as proof of ownership.
  • You live in the home or intend to reside in it - the home cannot be a rental property. 
  • You are doing the work yourself - you cannot pull a permit on behalf of the individual or company doing the work. If you are hiring someone to do the work for you, they will need to apply the permit. Visit our hiring a contractor  page to review the 5 steps to choosing a contractor.

Other requirements

  • Homeowners cannot pull a homeowner's electrical permit and plumbing permit for apartment-style condos. A licensed contractor must install the wiring in these types of residences. 
  • The electrical and/or plumbing system can only service that home, including a secondary suite contained within it. 
  • If the home is a semi-detached dwelling, one side of the property is acceptable (the side the owner lives in). This includes any accessory buildings on the same property. 
  • Row-type, individually owned condominium townhouses are acceptable with authorization from the condo board to the unit owner. The permit would apply only to the unit that the owner lives in. Other units in the complex are not included.
  • If the home is owned by a corporation, a director can pull this if they live there and are completing the work themselves. The City of Calgary will request a copy of the corporation documents to show proof of ownership. 

Electrical permit

separate electrical permit is required for:

  • All new wiring installations.
  • Extending or altering any existing electrical branch circuit wiring.
  • As a homeowner, you can: 
  • Tie into the main panel without physically changing it.
  • Add a sub-panel to an existing main service, provided there is an existing main breaker.
  • Install electrical wiring for above-ground swimming pools and hot tubs.

Our  homeowner electrical wiring guide provides important information to help homeowners who are interested in doing their own work. Other methods of installation not identified in this guide may be acceptable; however, all installations must meet the most current requirements of the National Electrical Code of Canada. 

Homeowners are not permitted to:

  • Install, alter or modify the main electrical service, including the main panel, main breaker or the meter base.
  • Install electrical wiring in permanent, in-ground swimming pools and hot tubs.
  • Install or alter solar photovoltaic systems.

A homeowner that is a journeyman electrician may apply for homeowner electrical permits that typical homeowners are not allowed to apply for. In order to qualify, you must:

  • Have a journeyman certificate.
  • Own the home.
  • Must live in the home.

For questions, please contact our Technical Assistance Centre.

Plumbing permit

A separate plumbing permit is required for:

  • All new plumbing systems.
  • Extending or altering plumbing systems.
  • Water and sewer lines in or around the home that are being replaced

Installing or replacing a hot water tank requires a permit in some situations. A permit is required if there are changes to:

  • The gas lines located upstream from the water heater shut off valve.
  • The venting system (e.g. size and design).
  • The type of water heater (e.g. changing from a natural draft water heater to a direct vent water heater).

A plumbing permit is not required to:

  • Repair a leak in a water distribution or drainage system.
  • Replace existing faucets and fixtures.
  • Remove blockage in the drainage.

Our homeowner plumbing guide provides important information to help homeowners who are interested in doing their own work. Other methods of installation not identified in this guide may be acceptable; however, all installations must meet the most current requirements of the National Plumbing Code of Canada.

What to do if the work has already been completed?

Concealed wiring procedure

If your renovation has previously been finished without proper permits, you can still apply for the permits after the work has been completed.

For an electrical permit, when the work has been concealed by drywall, you are required to follow the concealed wiring procedure. A homeowner’s permit cannot be issued for concealed wiring completed without proper permits. To have the inspection done, the owner must hire a licensed electrical contractor. The contractor will have to obtain an electrical permit and check that the wiring complies with electrical codes. However, the homeowner is responsible for any previously concealed electrical wiring.

Note: There is a possibility the inspector may ask for drywall to be removed to complete their inspection. 

Concealed plumbing procedure

If your renovation has previously been finished without proper permits, you can still apply for the permits after the work has been completed.

For a plumbing permit, when the work has been concealed by drywall, you are required to follow the concealed plumbing procedure. A homeowner’s permit cannot be issued for concealed plumbing completed without proper permits. To have the inspection done, the owner must hire a licensed plumbing contractor. The contractor will have to obtain a plumbing permit and check that the plumbing complies with plumbing codes. However, the homeowner is still responsible for any previously concealed plumbing.

Note: There is a possibility the inspector may ask for drywall to be removed to complete their inspection.

How to prepare your application


1. Prepare the application details

You will need to know:

  • The project address
  • Who is applying (the homeowner or someone representing the owner)
  • Who will be doing the work (contractor, homeowner)
  • What you are applying for
  • Project details, including the size of the building

2. Prepare the required documents and plans

Specific drawing and supporting document requirements are listed on the permit checklist. You must provide all the required drawings and documents when you submit your application.

Building permit application requirements

Supporting documents

1. Asbestos abatement form: This form only needs to be completed for houses built before 1990.

2. Section 9.36 (energy efficiency) project summary form

3. Proof of registration from the Government of Alberta’s New Home Buyer Program – when applicable. Visit residential protection program for more information.

Plans

We have provided sample drawings have been provided to assist you with completing your requirements – you should provide everything listed on the checklist as shown on the Sample Drawings.

1. Site plan

A Site Plan is a “bird’s eye” 2-D representation of a property and includes:

  • the location and dimensions of property lines,
  • structures on the property,
  • rights-of-way
  • other features unique to the property.

Tip: You can modify a Real Property Report (RPR) to use as your site Plan.

Your site plan must show the location and dimensions of the existing building, the proposed addition and any other buildings on the property.

2. Floor plans

  • You will need to provide floor plans for each floor of your house (i.e. basement, main floor, second floor, etc) affected by the proposed addition.
  • Label the purpose of how each room is used (i.e. kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, etc).
  • Indicate the size, type and operation of all bedroom windows.
  • Label and dimension any changes, including:
    • Existing walls, doors and windows
    • new doors and windows
    • new walls
    • new beams (if applicable)

3. Elevations

  • An elevation drawing is a 2D view of the house's exterior walls.
  • You must provide elevations for all sides of the house affected by the addition. For example, if you are adding a front porch, you will need to provide the front and side elevations of the entire house, including the new addition, but you would not need to include the rear elevation.
  • Indicate the locations and dimensions of all windows, doors and exterior stairs.
  • You will need to provide elevation drawings of each side of the house.

4. Structural cross-sections

  • The cross-section is a 2-D interior view of what the house looks like inside.
  • Your drawing should include the interior wall height, building height, all components of the wall, floor and roof assembly and the overall height of the new addition.

5. Manufacturer’s floor joist layouts, roof layouts, and the beam runs

  • You can obtain these from the manufacturers

6. Engineering Documents

  • These are only required for construction not covered under the National Building Code – Alberta Edition.

 

Development permit application requirements

Supporting documents

  1. Abandoned well declaration
    • A map of the subject property showing the presence or absence of Abandoned Well Locations on GeoDiscover Alberta’s Map Viewer must be included with the form.
    • Reference the user guide to finding abandoned wells for more information on how to locate your property.
  2. Public tree discolsure statement
    • Indicate yes or no if there is a public tree on the City lands within six meters of and/or overhanging your property.
    • If there are public trees, show these trees on your site plan and complete the rest of the form.
    • If you are not sure if there are public trees, you can use the city’s Tree Map (may not be up to date for your property) or contact 3-1-1 for a development tree inquiry.
  3.  Site contamination statement Indicate yes or no to the questions to your knowledge. If yes, provide the requested additional information when required.

Plans

Sample drawings  have been provided to assist you with completing your requirements – you should provide everything listed on the checklist as shown on the sample drawings.

Site plan

  • A Site Plan is a “bird’s eye” 2-D representation of a property and includes the location and dimensions of property lines, structures on the property, rights-of-way and other features unique to the property.
  • Tip: You can modify a Real Property Report (RPR) to use as your site Plan.
  • Your site plan must show the location and dimensions of the existing building, the proposed addition and any other buildings on the property.

Floor plans

  • You will need to provide floor plans for each floor of your house (i.e. basement, main floor, second floor, etc) affected by the proposed addition.
  • Label the purpose of how each room is used (i.e. kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, etc)
  • Indicate the size, type and operation of all bedroom windows. 
  • Label and dimension any changes, including:
    • Existing walls, doors and windows
    • new doors and windows
    • new walls
    • new beams (if applicable)

Elevations

  • An elevation drawing is a 2D view of the exterior walls of the house
  • You will need to provide elevations for all sides of the house affected by the addition. For example, if you are adding a front porch, you will need to provide the front and side elevations of the entire house, including the new addition, but you would not need to include the rear elevation.
  • Indicate the locations and dimensions of all windows, doors and exterior stairs
  • You will need to provide elevation drawings of each side of the house

Apply


Tips for a smooth application process

Before you apply

Download the checklist and check each application requirement as you prepare to submit your application. Items listed on the checklist are the minimum requirements. We might need more information after we review your application.

Provide all required documents on the checklist, including drawings, supporting material, and any additional forms. If you are not sure if something is required, contact the Planning services center

Use sample drawings to review what you need to include on your plans

Double check your documents are completed and make sure you have all required items on your plans before you upload them

After you apply

The Planning services centre may contact you for more information required for your application. Follow-up on requests for more information as quickly as possible. 

Use the Job Access Code (JAC) to check status updates for your application on calgary.ca/vista

  • You’ll get a JAC by e-mail after you’ve submitted your application. If you did not receive a JAC number, contact the Planning services center.
  • Checking your application’s status using your JAC will provide you with timely updates about the status of your application

What is a complete application?

A complete application means that you have provided all the necessary requirements for our teams to complete their reviews. You should provide everything listed on the Complete Application Requirement List, including plans, supporting documents and payment.

An application for a permit may be refused  if, within ninety (90) days from the date of receipt,  if adequate information and documentation is not supplied as requested by the Safety Codes Officer. Should a permit be considered for refusal, the applicant will be given notification in writing and 30 days to resubmit the missing information. For more information, please review Building advisory A19-002 building permit complete application.

Apply online

To apply online, you need a myID account. Create a myID account.

We’re currently experiencing higher than seasonal application volumes, we apologize for delays. To check the status of your permit, go to vista.calgary.ca and enter in your Job Access Code (JAC) number

Apply in-person

Complete the application form.

Once you have gathered all required documents, you can apply for your permit in person by visiting the Planning aervices centre.

After you apply


How to check the status of your permit

After you submit your application online, you will get a confirmation email with a Job Access Code (JAC).

To track your application and check its status, enter your Job Access Code in Vista.

If you need help or have questions, contact our Planning services centre

What Inspections do you need?

Home renovations and basements

Framing (rough-in) inspection requirements

  • Install and complete any structural changes.
  • Install and complete all the wall and ceiling framing.
  • Install proposed windows and exterior doors.
  • Install and complete any HVAC changes.
  • Rough in, install and complete all plumbing and electrical components that are required under associated permits.
  • Have requested documentation on site.
  • Do not install insulation, vapour barrier or drywall over any work that requires inspection prior to concealing.

How do you book your inspections?

Visit Building inspections for information on how to book, cancel or reschedule an inspection, permit expiry and the requirements for each inspection type.

Make changes to your permit


Planning Services Centre

Hours:
Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. (MT)

Live chat:
calgary.ca/livechat

Call:
403-268-5311

In person: 
Planning services centre,
3rd floor, Municipal building 
800 Macleod Trail SE

Book an eAppointment for in person services at appointment.calgary.ca


This information has no legal status and cannot be used as an official interpretation of the various bylaws, codes and regulations currently in effect. The City of Calgary accepts no responsibility to persons relying solely on this information. Web pages are updated periodically. ​