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Property tax - frequently asked questions

Do you have questions about your property taxes? Read our frequently asked questions below.

Budget and property tax rates


Where do my property tax dollars go?

The funds collected through property tax are generally split between the Alberta Government and The City. About 63% of all residential property taxes will go towards City services while about 37% will be sent to the Government of Alberta. 

City Council sets the annual budget needed to pay for services that benefit all Calgarians.

The City budget is paid from property taxes, plus other sources including license fees, provincial grants and user fees like transit fares.

Your property taxes support services like police, fire protection, garbage collection, transit, parks, recreation, social services and more.

See where your tax dollars go using the tax breakdown tool

What is the municipal property tax rate this year?

Council approved tax increase is effectively zero this year after the one-time rebate, there still will be increased tax bill amounts for residential property owners. The residential municipal tax rate increased from last year by approximately 7.5%. This is made up of:

  • A 0.75% increase because of Provincial revenue decrease. Reductions in City revenues from fines and higher costs for biological testing as a result of 2019 provincial budget.
  • A 6.76% increase because of a shift in tax responsibility from non-residential tax payers to residential tax payers.

The 6.76% is not a tax rate increase to fund additional services, but an increase in the share of property tax residential property owners are paying to lessen the amounts paid by local businesses. Because there are fewer businesses than homes, this can translate into 10.08% tax rate decrease for non-residential property owners.

View current property tax rates.

Learn how The City determines the property tax rate.​​​​

What is the combined municipal and provincial property tax rate increase in 2020?

The combination of the municipal and provincial increases results in a combined increase to residential taxpayers of:

  • 7.55 per cent or $240 per year ($20 per month) for the median assessed property of $455,000 after the Council rebate.

Excluding the impact of assessment changes and PTP rebates, non-residential taxpayers will see a combined decrease of:

  • 12.07 per cent or $2,640 per $1 million of assessed value annually ($220 per month) after the Council rebate.
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How will this impact Calgary households?

The combination of the municipal and provincial tax changes results in a combined increase to residential taxpayers of 7.55% or $240 per year for the typical assessed property of $455,000 after the Council rebate.

However, the assessment year-to-year change in the value of the resident’s property will also impact their tax bill. In 2020, the overall market change in residential market is -4 %. If the property, the resident is paying taxes on has an approximate year-to-year % change in assessment of:

  • Less than the typical per cent change (-4%): The portion of taxes owed will be less than the 7.5% increase.
  • The same as the typical per cent change (-4%): The portion of taxes owed will be approximately the 7.5% increase.
  • More than the typical per cent change (-4%): The portion of taxes owed will be more than the 7.5% increase.
For household examples of these year-to-year percentage changes, visit calgary.ca/financialfacts​.

If you’re looking to estimate your taxes after you received your assessment and prior to receiving your tax bill you can do so at calgary.ca/taxcalculator​.

Read more about how property assessment affects your property taxes.

What if I'm having problems paying my taxes?

If you are a residential property owner experiencing financial hardship there are a number of programs offering assistance. Under The City's Property Tax Assistance Program, residential property owners of any age may be eligible for a credit/grant. You can find more information at calgary.ca/ptap, Fair Entry or contacting 311.

For information on programs for seniors such as the Seniors Property Tax Deferral Program, contact the Government of Alberta at 310-0000 or 403-268-CITY(2489) if calling from outside Calgary.​

The City of Calgary is supporting citizens and businesses in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Council approved municipal property tax relief measures that support taxpayers facing financial hardship. Go to calgary.ca/propertytax for important information you need to know as a residential or non-residential property owner seeking tax relief due to the COVID-19 pandemic.​

Tax bill


When do I get my tax bill?

Property tax bills are mailed in May and cover the calendar year Jan. 1 – Dec. 31. Property tax bills and account information are not available online.

Property owners who have not received a tax bill by the first week of June can request a copy of the bill.

You can also change the mailing address​ for your property tax bill and assessment notice.​​

How do I pay my tax bill?

The City of Calgary offers a variety of property tax payment options​ to pay The City directly or through your bank. Credit cards cannot be used to pay property tax.

The Tax Instalment Payment Plan (TIPP) is a popular program that allows you to pay your property tax on a monthly basis instead of making one payment in June. Your payment automatically comes out of your chequing account the first day of every month, making paying your property tax easier.

Have you moved recently? Make sure you update your property roll number when you make a payment through your bank.​

When are property taxes due?

Property taxes are due June 30, 2020.

A 7% penalty is added to any unpaid tax bill balance after September 30.​​

The City of Calgary is supporting citizens and businesses in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Council approved municipal property tax relief measures that support taxpayers facing financial hardship. Go to calgary.ca/propertytax​ for important information you need to know as a residential or non-residential property owner seeking tax relief due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

I filed a complaint against my assessment with the Assessment Review Board. Do I still have to pay my taxes by the due date?

Yes. If you have filed a complaint against your assessment you must still pay your taxes by the due date to avoid a late payment penalty.

If the Assessment Review Board (LARB or CARB) or Court of Queen's Bench or Municipal Government Board makes a decision on your complaint that results in a lower tax levy, the reduction is credited to the tax account. If this tax reduction results in a credit balance, interest is paid on the municipal portion. A refund cheque is issued for accounts with a credit balance greater than $25 (credits of less than $25 will remain on the account.)

Do I have options other than paying the entire tax bill amount on June 30?

The Tax Instalment Payment Plan (TIPP) is a popular program that allows you to pay your property tax on a monthly basis instead of one payment in June, making budgeting easier.

Property assessments


Where can I find my property's assessed value

Property assessment notices are mailed in January to all property owners, both residential and non-residential.

You can find the assessed value of your property or any other Calgary property online using Assessment Search. You do not have to log in to search for assessed values, however, for more detailed information (including your previous year's assessment, your tax information and specific property details) you can log into Assessment Search using your City myID account.

For more information on how to use Assessment Search, see the help guides for property owners.

How is my property assessed?

Your property assessment notice sent in January is based on your property's market value, the amount it likely would have sold for last July 1st, and improvements to its physical condition as of Dec. 31.

The assessment process follows legislative requirements set by the Province on how properties are assessed to determine the values for all properties, which in turn determines the distribution of municipal taxes. Assessors look at many factors including your property's details such as age, location, lot size, additions or renovations and sales of similar properties in the neighbourhood in the last three years. Your individual assessment comes from the analysis of sold properties in your neighbourhood that are very similar to yours.

Your assessed property value goes through internal checks and balances and a provincial audit before the notice is mailed to you in early January.

What if I don't agree with the assessed value?

If you have any questions or concerns about your assessment, contact Assessment at 403-268-2888 during the Customer Review Period as printed on your notice. Your assessor may be able to resolve your concerns without the need to file a formal complaint.

If you still disagree with your assessment, visit the Assessment Review Board for more information and/or to file a complaint online. Formal complaints with the Assessment Review Board can only be made during the dates indicated on your assessment notice.

How does my assessment affect my property taxes?

Your property assessment is used to determine your share of taxes, relative to all properties in Calgary, to meet The City's budget needs.

Once Council has set the tax rate, your assessment is then multiplied by the tax rate and the result is your share of property tax shown on your tax bill.

If my property’s assessed value increases, decreases or stays the same, will my tax bill change at the same rate?

The increase or decrease you’ll see in your property tax bill is based on your year-to-year assessment change related to the overall market change and the change in the tax rate. Even if the yearly tax rate and your year-to-year assessment remains unchanged, it doesn’t mean the portion of taxes you pay will also remain unchanges.

Your property tax can change from year to year if your property's assessed value increases or decreases greater than the change in the overall assessment base.

As a result of the 2020 assessment, the overall market change in residential is minus 4 per cent and non-residential is plus 2 per cent. If your property’s approximate year-to-year per cent change in assessment is:

  • Less than the overall change: That property’s revenue neutral taxes will decrease.
  • The same as the typical per cent change: That property’s revenue neutral taxes will stay about the same.
  • More than the typical per cent change: That property’s revenue neutral taxes will increase.

The tax Calculator, available online at calgary.ca/revenueneutral, factors in the estimates your property tax taxes before Council approves the budget and the property tax bylaw, and your actual taxes once the budget and tax rate is approved.

You can search for your current property assessment using Assessment Search. Learn how your property is assessed.​​

As a business or resident, who rents space from a property owner who’s impacted by changes in the assessed value, do I receive an assessment notice?

The City of Calgary only taxes and communicates directly with the property owner. However, based on your lease agreement with your landlord a portion of taxes may be passed on to you. It’s important you’re aware of the details of your agreement for you can plan for impacts due to an increased assessment or tax rate.

By speaking to your landlord they may share the assessment notice they received and the impacts you’ll see with you. If they are disputing their assessed value they may also inform you of the process and impacts.

As a tenant you can also find the assessed value of the property you rent or any other Calgary property online using Assessment Search.

Once you have the assessed value you can use the tax calculator​ to estimate what portion of tax is allocated to the property and based on your leaseholder agreement and discussions with your landlord determine the amount that may be passed on to you.

Where can I get more information?


If you have questions about property tax, contact 311.

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